Grain-Free Pie Crust and Butter Cookie Dough

Paleo Dough

I have an admission to make – while it is generally accepted that I make one helluva good pie crust, I have freely admitted (when asked) to have been working from another’s recipe. The Silver Pallete cookbook has been a mainstay of our household, since before I was even part of this household. The binding is worn and 3/4 of the pages are falling out, and it is well used.

The Pâté Brissé recipe towards the back – it is not so much a recipe as one of a set of tips – explains the secret: cold, cold, COLD butter, and just enough water to let the dough form.

Making a grain-free version of this crust is a bit tricky, because what tends to make for a very good pie crust – flaky but not crumbly – is gluten. Gluten holds everything else together, and its binding power is hard to replace. We’ll use an egg here, but you can also try – if you’re brave enough – a mixture of tapioca starch, arrowroot powder and ground flax seed (about 1/8 cup each) to try to make things a bit gooey-er. But honestly, a single egg works fine. Scramble it first, before you mix it in with the other ingredients.

The trick here is to use a bit of teff flour. Teff is not a grain – it is the seed of a grass – and teff flour may even qualify as Paleo if it is properly fermented prior to cooking (I don’t do that here.)

As you’ll see in the steps below, the trick is to have ice-cold chopped up butter and to work it into the dry ingredients quickly but without heating it up. A strong set of wrists help, as well as a very solid fork.

Grain-Free Paleoish Pie Crust/Butter Cookies
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
1 9" Crust 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 25 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 9" Crust 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 25 Minutes
Grain-Free Paleoish Pie Crust/Butter Cookies
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
1 9" Crust 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 25 Minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 9" Crust 20 Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 Minutes 25 Minutes
Ingredients
Servings: 9" Crust
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees
  2. Add Teff flour, almond flour, salt and baking powder to a bowl.
  3. Chop the butter, which should already be frozen, into cubes, and add to the bowl of dry ingredients. Frozen butter is the secret to every decent pie crust you've ever had, and that's what we're shooting for here.
  4. With a sturdy metal fork or wooden spoon, begin smearing the butter into the dry ingredients. You can do this in a cuisinart blender as well, but you will not get credit for the reps. You'll also need to move more quickly with a blender, because the heat from the blade will melt the butter, and you really don't want that.
  5. Eventually you will have "sheets" of butter encrusted with the dry ingredients. You can stop mixing at this point - you don't want to completely incorporate the butter and the dry ingredients any further.
  6. Scramble the egg throughly, and then add to the dough. Mix until incorporated. There's usually enough water in the egg to form a dough ball, but if not, add up to 1-2 TBSP of water. Stop when a ball forms.
  7. Put the dough in the the freezer for 10-15 minutes. The goal is again to get the butter nice and cold. A good crust can only form if the butter melts as the crust hardens in the oven.
  8. Remove the dough ball from the freezer. Place a sheet of wax paper down on the baking sheet, and put the dough ball on top.
  9. Place another sheet of wax paper on top of the dough ball, and roll it out to approximately 1/4" thickness. Work quickly, you don't want that butter to melt!
  10. Remove the top sheet of wax paper, flip the rolled out dough over into a 9" pie plate, and remove the other piece of wax paper. If the dough is sticking too much to the wax paper as you remove it, put the entire sheet back in the freezer for 10 minutes, and try again.
  11. (Optional) Place a clean sheet of parchment paper onto the pie crust, and cover the pie tin with dried beans or rice. You want to use something that will keep the pie crust weighted down. Note that this tends to not make much of a difference with the Paleo version of this crust, but the gluten-y original will puff up unless weighted down in this way.
  12. Alternatively, if you are making butter cookies, this is where you'll cut the crust into shapes and arrange on a cookie sheet.
  13. Bake in the oven at 425 degrees for 15-20 minutes.
  14. Remove and allow to cool.
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Pumpkin Spiced Buttered Popcorn

Pumpkin Spiced Popcorn

Back in 1893, Charles D. Cretors introduced the first commercial steam-driven popcorn machine at the Chicago World’s Fair. Hewing to an original commercial recipes that featured clarified butter, lard and salt, these machines were the first to be able to produce a consistently popped popcorn.

We’ve updated the recipe only slightly, adding the now-ubiquitous pumpkin spices adorning everything from bagels to potato chips to lip gloss.

Pumpkin Spice Butter Coffee
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 cups 5 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 cups 5 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Pumpkin Spice Butter Coffee
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
4 cups 5 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Servings Prep Time
4 cups 5 minutes
Cook Time
5 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: cups
Instructions
  1. Combine all of the spices in a small mixing bowl.
  2. Add unpopped popcorn kernels to the bowl.
  3. Melt 2 TBSP butter in a smal dish in the microwave.
  4. Pour butter over popcorn and spice mixture. Stir to coat.
  5. Heat a heavy pan (cast iron is best) over high heat. You should have a heavy lid to match the pan.
  6. When the pain is HOT (drip a drop of water on the pan; it should sizzle and evaporate immediately), add 1 TBSP of butter to the pan and allow it to melt.
  7. Pour the butter-spice-popcorn mixture into the pan and cover immediately with the lid.
  8. Shake the pan over high heat, keeping it continuously moving. You want the kernels to be rolling around in the pan; if they are still for too long, the popcorn will burn.
  9. You'll hear the kernels begin to sizzle in the pan, and then they'll start to pop. Keep shaking that pan back and forth! All of the kernels should pop within 20-30 seconds, a minute at most.
  10. As soon as there are 1-2 seconds between pops, remove the pan from the heat and remove the lid (careful, there'll be a lot of steam).
  11. Pour into a large bowl, sprinkle with salt to taste, and serve immediately!
Recipe Notes

Substitute 1 packet of Pumpkin Spice fatCoffee mix for all of the ingredients except the popcorn. This works best if you are using an air popper or one of these silicone microwave poppers  instead of a the stove method (the powdered milk in the fatCoffee will tend to burn on the stove.) Follow the directions provided by your air popper for adding butter and flavorings.

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Tis the Season for Seasonal Flavors

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One of the nice things about controlling your own production process – as opposed to working with a third party copacker – is that it’s relatively easy for us to try new things. Of course, we need to tread carefully, but small changes are pretty simple.

Plus, I get bored easily, and I like mixing and matching new flavors to see what I can come up with.

We have four new flavors of fatCoffee now – bringing us to a total of seven, which is fairly amazing considering that we really only started offering fatCoffee for sale to the public less than two years ago. No other butter coffee product even comes close – not in terms of quality ingredients (no “highly branched cyclic dextrin” in our products), or variety of flavors.

Now available, for a limited time (perhaps):

Pumpkin Spice fatCoffeefatCoffee Pumpkin Spice
Apparently, this is a seasonal flavor. As in, “you know, Ben, it’s supposed to go away at some point in the year.” What do I know? I like it as much in June as I do in October, but the truth is: if it doesn’t go away for a while, it just isn’t special when it comes back.

 


fatCoffee Mocha OrangefatCoffee Mocha Orange
Rich and fragrant, with a hint of organic cold-pressed orange oil. As with any of our flavors, we use only natural ingredients. Look on your food package labels for the words “natural flavorings”, and shudder at the fact that that can mean almost anything.

This one’s inspired by the Terry Chocolate Orange – I buy a bunch of these every year to give around the holidays. Like the Terry’s Chocolate Orange, remember to “whack, and unwrap” your fatCoffee packets. Seriously, contents may separate, so mash it up!


fatCoffee Mocha MintfatCoffee Mocha Mint
A chocolate peppermint latte, with a tiny bit of organic essential peppermint leaf oil for a snappy, crisp and wintery beverage to start your day. Or finish it.

I love this in the late morning once I’m at the office – particularly after trudging through the bracing late-fall winds on the 2-mile walk in. It’s the perfect way to bring a tiny little bit of winter inside.

 


And (shhhh….) fatCoffee Chocolate Pine
A friend of ours sent a link to a Milk Chocolate Bar with Pine Oil from Switzerland, which we promptly ordered a 1/2 dozen of. They were delicious, ever-so-slightly reminiscent of the Redwoods forests of Northern California – and impossible to resist imitating. Friends who’ve tried this have called it “familiar”, and “enticing” – and we’re excited to share it with you. Soon!

But not yet! Only Premium Subscribers will get a chance to taste it in our December boxes. Sign up today!

We are selling out of fatCoffee pretty regularly, but if you place your order here, you’ll always be first in line when we restock, which we are doing about every two weeks now.

Posted on

Oh, Canada!

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At least twice a week, someone writes in to ask, “how can I get fatCoffee in Canada! We love butter coffee!”

And the short answer is: you can order some here, and pay a rather exorbitant shipping cost. Also, Canadian customs might demand a fairly heavy tariff when your box is imported. But there are some other options:

You can order a whole case, and split it with friends/keep it for yourself/sell it to other butter coffee aficionados. If that’s interesting to you, inquire here about getting a wholesale account.

There are also some options for international shipping that we have outlined here.

Why Can’t We Just Distribute fatCoffee in Canada?

The answer is somewhat complex, but can be simplified as: because we use real ingredients, and not artificial crap, to make fatCoffee.

Specifically, 100% grass-fed butter. And because of that, fatCoffee is categorized as a “butter product”, which means it’s subject to an import quota in Canada (hey, who knew?) And this year (2016), at least, that quota has been filled. Which means that if we tried to export fatCoffee from the U.S. into Canada, we’d have to pay a 300% import tariff. And we’d have to pass the savings on to you :).

So What Are We Going to Do About It?

Other than the alternatives we’ve listed above, there’s not a lot we can do about it. We can apply for an exemption from Canadian Customs, which we’re doing, but which will take a few months to work through. And we can try next year, when the quota “resets.”

So, What Aren’t We Going to Do About It?

First and foremost, we’re not going to change what we put into fatCoffee. Other butter-coffee-product manufacturers use all sorts of funky ingredients, so that you’d have to take their use of term “butter” rather lightly. Sort of like “collector’s edition comics” or “natural flavors.”

Also, regardless of the dire state of our political life here in America, we don’t currently have plans to move to Canada. Yet.

What Can YOU Do About It?

If you know of a local coffee shop, food co-op, grocery store or wholesale distributor in Canada who would like to purchase and resell fatCoffee, put them in touch with us! And in the meantime, gather up some friends and order some fatCoffee for everyone!